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Process

Product Council = PC = PM, CEO's, HoP
All Milestone decision making below is by the PC. 

Phase 1: Collect Customer Need Hypothesis (aka Collect Ideas)

  • I.e. brainstorms, customer feedback analysis, market research, etc. Let's start with what we have plus ideas by Thomas/Arco/Davide. 
  • Do a quick sort of needs we want to validate and select some (PC) 
  • Who: Anyone can deliver input. First grouping/deduplication/sorting by PM's. 
  • Output: Needs hypothesis to validate and / or collect data on 

Milestone 1 Decision making: Which Needs will we investigate & test? (this period, i.e. 4 weeks). 

Phase 2: Test Need Hypothesis 

  • I.e. brainstorms, customer feedback analysis, market research, etc. Let's start with what we have plus ideas by Thomas/Arco/Davide. 
  • Do a quick sort of needs we want to validate and select some (PC) 
  • Who: Either GHT or PM&IT as desired per need.
  • Output: Needs hypothesis to validate and / or collect data on 

Milestone 2 Decision making: For which Validated needs we want to design and estimate a high level solution

Phase 3: Test Solution Hypothesis & data collection

  • Discussion of Solution ideas with team & estimation
  • Gathering data, doing experiments.  
  • Creating short business case
  • Sorting Needs based on gathered data and tests (using combination of data and input by PC). Ideally as objective as possible using PC predefined prioritization formula.
  • Who: Either GHT and/or PM&IT as desired per need. (depending if a 2d solution (test) is possible). 
  • Output: (In)validated Needs incl supporting data sorted by priority

Milestone 3 Decision making: Theme Prioritization: Which Theme's (solutions) we'll put on the roadmap? (next 3) 


Roadmap priorization

See sub page


Long term solution / process



Roadmap 6 week blocks with 2 week "break"


https://medium.com/intercom-inside/6-weeks-why-its-the-goldilocks-of-product-timeframes-c7b14c493993?_hsenc=p2ANqtz-9kCI_7bhsnE8eM_3RQurUPYxr1gxjI0rcdjC3O-ogW3Faolu2ZuO7Up6muV-NUAuU5TR16Xn3G5-IGdr_QNYrwVc5b1Q&_hsmi=52577947


Product Council & Decision making milestones

  • The purpose of the product council is to set the strategic product direction, allocate product resources and investments, and provide a level of oversight of the company’s product efforts. This group is not trying to set the company’s business strategy, but rather—given the business strategy—come up with a product strategy that will meet the needs of the business. Typical members:
    • CEO, COO or Division GM VP/Director of Product Management (leader of the product council)VP/Director of User Experience Design VP/Director of Marketing VP/Director of Engineering VP/Director of Site Operations VP/Director of Customer Service


For each product effort (except minor updates or fixes) there are five major milestones ("gates") for product council review and decision making:

  1. Milestone 1: Review proposed product strategies and product roadmaps, and initiate opportunity assessments for specific product releases. That is, select the product opportunities to be investigated.
  2. Milestone 2: Review opportunity assessments and recommendations, and issue go/no-go decisions to begin discovering a solution (=design prototype, do estimate).
  3. Milestone 3: Review product prototypes, user testing results and detailed cost estimates, and issue go/no-go decision to begin engineering.
  4. Milestone 4: Review final product, QA status, launch plans, and community impact assessments, and issue go/no-go decision to launch.
  5. Post launch assessment: It can be useful for the product council to review the business performance of the products that have launched. The product council may request a presentation on the business results of the product launch, typically 3-6 months post-launch. This sort of accountability will help the council better understand which investments and decisions they made were good ones, and why.


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